GPUBoss Review Our evaluation of R9 380 vs R9 285 among Desktop GPUs

Gaming

Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Bioshock Infinite and 21 more

Graphics

T-Rex, Manhattan, Cloud Gate Factor, Sky Diver Factor and 1 more

Computing

Face Detection, Ocean Surface Simulation and 3 more

Performance per Watt

Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Bioshock Infinite and 32 more

Value

Battlefield 3, Battlefield 4, Bioshock Infinite and 32 more

Noise and Power

TDP, Idle Power Consumption, Load Power Consumption and 2 more

7.2

Overall Score

Winner
AMD Radeon R9 380 

GPUBoss recommends the AMD Radeon R9 380  based on its benchmarks and compute performance.

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VS

AMD Radeon R9 380

GPUBoss Winner
Front view of Radeon R9 380

Differences What are the advantages of each

Front view of Radeon R9 380

Reasons to consider the
AMD Radeon R9 380

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More memory 4,096 MB vs 2,048 MB 2x more memory
Much higher FarCry 3 framerate 80 vs 35 More than 2.2x higher FarCry 3 framerate
Better PassMark direct compute score 2,938 vs 2,442 More than 20% better PassMark direct compute score
Front view of Radeon R9 285

Reasons to consider the
XFX Radeon R9 285

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GPUBoss is not aware of any important advantages of the XFX Radeon R9 285 vs the AMD Radeon R9 380.

Benchmarks Real world tests of Radeon R9 380 vs 285

Bitcoin mining Data courtesy CompuBench

Radeon R9 380
410.27 mHash/s
Radeon R9 285
391.4 mHash/s

Face detection Data courtesy CompuBench

Radeon R9 380
84.59 mPixels/s
Radeon R9 285
72.8 mPixels/s

Ocean surface simulation Data courtesy CompuBench

Radeon R9 380
1,503.63 frames/s
Radeon R9 285
1,474.63 frames/s

T-Rex (GFXBench 3.0) Data courtesy CompuBench

Radeon R9 380
3,352.22
Radeon R9 285
3,355.84

Manhattan (GFXBench 3.0) Data courtesy CompuBench

Radeon R9 380
3,708.86
Radeon R9 285
3,715.04

Fire Strike Factor Data courtesy FutureMark

Sky Diver Factor Data courtesy FutureMark

FarCry 3

Comments

Showing 4 comments.
The 380 IS a 285 relabeled and slightly overclocked. You can overclock you 285 to the exact speed of 380 and get the exact same specs.
The key is the bargain you can get. I wanted the latest AMD GCN version 1.2 that has the best support for current DX12 API of any GPU available and all the long list of the 300 series new features like True Audio digtal sound and many others. I found all that in the R9 285 just released last year with all the 300 series new features and I only paid $117.00 with shipping. With the new color compression VRAM is used with 40% more efficiency giving the same performance as 3.5GB of VRAM. This is how the 285 can beat competition 4GB VRAM cards in benchmarks. With more focus on newer cards with more VRAM the price of the 380 will hold while the 285 drops. If you want to play just about any current AAA game on ultra settings at 1080p this is your card. Higher resolutions will be better served with the first line GPUs like the 980ti as the 285 is a 1080p beast only. When DX12 games start to hit the market expect these AMD GPUs and CPUs to see up t0 80% game performance increase. In short AMD products were designed for DX12 five years ago thinking DX12 would arrive sooner than it did. Nividia and Intel mastered DX11 support while ignoring the future. Like DX11 did to AMD DX12 is doing to the competition, hurting performance. For the near future AMD is the way to go until things change.
The 380 is the way to go at twice the VRAM. The 380 and 285 are nearly identical in price and specs.
so...the 380 is just 45 mghz faster but the 285 costs $20 more other than that no difference. ok
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